8 Reasons Why Students Should Be Taught Religion at School

Why Students Should Be Taught Religion at School
People have different opinions around the world about whether we should include religion as part of a school’s curriculum or not. Some agree with introducing religion classes to our kids, whereas, some others are reluctant.

I have been hearing this debate since long, after which I decided to dig it out myself. After going through all the negative and positive opinions, and the impact of religion classes on a student’s brain and performance, I share over here what I deduce.
1. Improved Brain Growth
Studies have shown that students who are given religion classes since beginning possess much more creativity as compared to others. Learning religious stories (which at times sound out of this world) develops a sense a curiosity among the students, and a passion for knowing more. Hence, their desire improves their brainstorming ability.
2. Helps Children Learn Discipline
After hearing since childhood about the good deeds and bad deed concepts, students of religion are much easier to teach manners and discipline. With the ideas in mind of being rewarded or punished for whatever they do, these students are less likely to fall for juvenile delinquency.

3. Better School Performance
Schools, where religion is taught, have proven to be better educators. They train their students in a more disciplined and hardworking environment. They tend to motivate their students for every smallest achievement of their career. Hence, the personas created in such optimistic environment serve our society in a better way.
4. Helps Developing Positive Psychology
Teaching religion in the early classes of a student’s academic career helps in building up a sense of optimism. The belief of having a supreme authority that takes care of every human develops positivity and calmness in human psychology. Hence, schools where religion tends to provide better individuals to the society.
5. Develops An Urge To Learn More
Every religion has some factual stories that always leave us thinking more. Hence we tend to research the topic for a better understanding. The same goes true for students. Studying religion at school level makes them curious to know more. This instinct eventually develops for every subject. Consequently, students develop a habit of in-depth studying with a passion for learning more about everything.
6. Alleviates Depression Among The Students
As said above, studying religion develops optimism among the students. It makes them look at the brighter side of everything. Studies have shown that students who study religion are less likely to get depressed. Particularly, those teens who study religion do not fall prey to the typical ‘teenage depression’.

7. Students Tend To Recognize Themselves
When a student learns about religion, he/she develops an innate instinct to research the beliefs. Such students are always found asking various questions about the religious facts, about what they believe, about what is being practiced, and so on. Their urge to know more keeps the students wandering around their kith and kin while trying to find out detailed answers to their queries. When they develop such skills in the initial years of their lives, they eventually pass through the self-recognition phase more easily as compared to the others. They have an answer for whatever they practice. Hence, they grow up as useful individuals of the society.
 
8. Develops Tolerant Attitude
Various studies have shown that students who have studied religion as one of their majors in school havemore patient behavior. They are open to knowing other’s viewpoints whenever they get involved in any debate. Instead of being enraged, they have a calm personality. They believe in convincing others with positive criticism rather than bullying or negatively pinpointing at issues.
Conclusion:
Although it is unfair to impose religion to the extent of conservative lifestyles,, studying religion in a neutral way has tremendous benefits. So instead of opposing religious curriculum at schools right away, one needs to look at the positive aspects too. Maybe our students turn up to be better individuals of the future due to their religious knowledge.

Author Bio: Andrew James is a freelance writer Essay Writing Help and socialist. He keeps addressing various social issues that usually go unnoticed.
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Comments 4

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Dick Pellek (website) on Thursday, 15 February 2018 15:54

Consider me a critic, or consider me an analyst, but my comments are meant to stimulate others. Teaching religion in schools is fine, as long as the religious dogma is non-sectarian. Will it be permissible to teach Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, and Christianity in equal measure? Who decides what is to be included in the curriculum? Most major religions offer religious instruction to young children outside of schools supported by public funds. Potential conflicts have thus been avoided.

Consider me a critic, or consider me an analyst, but my comments are meant to stimulate others. Teaching religion in schools is fine, as long as the religious dogma is non-sectarian. Will it be permissible to teach Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, and Christianity in equal measure? Who decides what is to be included in the curriculum? Most major religions offer religious instruction to young children outside of schools supported by public funds. Potential conflicts have thus been avoided.
Sherita Green (website) on Monday, 17 September 2018 14:09

An ongoing report found that religious kids will probably accept anecdotal stories and have a harder time isolating dream of the real world, yet that is not too awful having faith in fiction and having an inventive personality can be useful in mental health brain research today, for instance, found that imaginative play is useful for kids. Love Hate Robert Sheehan Jacket

An ongoing report found that religious kids will probably accept anecdotal stories and have a harder time isolating dream of the real world, yet that is not too awful having faith in fiction and having an inventive personality can be useful in mental health brain research today, for instance, found that imaginative play is useful for kids. Love Hate Robert Sheehan Jacket
Susan Webb on Monday, 09 December 2019 21:50

The topic of religion is special, but in my opinion it is obligatory for children to study in schools. Because it gives an opportunity to study the cultural and religious peculiarities of society from an early age and to choose a position at a later age. I am interested in culture and art looking for someone who will do take my test for me on a topic I am not interested in

The topic of religion is special, but in my opinion it is obligatory for children to study in schools. Because it gives an opportunity to study the cultural and religious peculiarities of society from an early age and to choose a position at a later age. I am interested in culture and art looking for someone who will do [url=https://writessay.org/take-my-test-for-me.php]take my test for me[/url] on a topic I am not interested in
Dick Pellek (website) on Monday, 19 February 2018 12:39

In many colleges they have courses that might be titled "The Great Religions" so religion is being taught in schools, as electives. When a person majors in religion it is being learned and the academics are doing the teaching. Thus there is teaching and learning. To learn about your preferred religion there are Sunday Schools, Bible Camps, study groups, and the like. Teaching and learning are going on...with people who willingly participate, but outside of public schools that are financed by taxes.

When religion is taught in Catholic Schools, Buddist Schools, Madrasas, and the like; the teachers are relatively well qualified, but if a non-descript religion is taught in public schools, you may or may not get a teacher who shares your own religious values. It is not surprising that you may know "many mixed religion personals at your cheap assignment help office team" that don't know a thing about their religion. In my opinion, that is up to the family, not a public school. Of course, the question of what religion or religions should be taught has not been addressed. It matters because school boards approve the curriculums.

In many colleges they have courses that might be titled "The Great Religions" so religion is being taught in schools, as electives. When a person majors in religion it is being learned and the academics are doing the teaching. Thus there is teaching and learning. To learn about your preferred religion there are Sunday Schools, Bible Camps, study groups, and the like. Teaching and learning are going on...with people who willingly participate, but outside of public schools that are financed by taxes. When religion is taught in Catholic Schools, Buddist Schools, Madrasas, and the like; the teachers are relatively well qualified, but if a non-descript religion is taught in public schools, you may or may not get a teacher who shares your own religious values. It is not surprising that you may know "many mixed religion personals at your cheap assignment help office team" that don't know a thing about their religion. In my opinion, that is up to the family, not a public school. Of course, the question of what religion or religions should be taught has not been addressed. It matters because school boards approve the curriculums.